A Plethora of Summer Reading Game Book Reviews!

Everybody’s talking about the books they are reading!  We’ve had a stack of book reviews lately, and here they are to help guide your summer reading.

TheMagiciansThe Magicians by Lev Grossman

“Borrowing a bit from Harry Potter and The Chronicles of Narnia, Grossman has crafted a world of magic that is edgier, darker and more chaotic than most writers of fantasy.  His characters are real in the flaws and highly intriguing. An adult magical adventure that will draw readers to the next two books.  Yes, you can start now. The trilogy is complete.”  ~Patron review from Joan T., July 2015

Category: Fantasy

touchingtheearthTouching the Earth by Roberta Bondar

“Dr. Roberta Bondar, the first Canadian woman in space, gives the reader an insight into the unique perspective and wonder she experienced from the opportunity to view her home planet from space.  Her deep love of nature and the extremes beauty and diversity of Earth are celebrated in this account of her flight and how it shaped her. She was surely a deserving candidate to represent Canada in the space program.”  ~Patron review from Joan T., July 2015

Category: Bios & Memoirs

Essays in Love by Alain de Botton

“A wonderfully relatable,  witty & engaging blend of personal memoir, love story & philosophical musings about the nature of love. One reviewer very aptly described Alain de Botton as “a young British Woody Allen with the benefit of a classical education” – that sums it up quite nicely!”  ~Staff Review by Luise M-J, July 2015

Category: Short Stories

The Man in the Shed by Lloyd Jones

“What a sad litany of stories, where every husband is a cuckold and no marriage can be comprehended as consisting of loving, caring friendship, or communication of any meaningful kind!”  ~Patron review, July 2015

Category: Short Stories

And Then There Were Nuns by Jane Christmas

nuns

“Jane Christmas lives in a few monasteries over a period of a few months as she tries to decide if she should become a nun or get married to her boyfriend who’d just proposed to her. In typical Jane Christmas fashion, the book is honest, down to earth, and a quick read.”  ~Patron review, July 2015

Category: Adventure

 

 

Go Set a Watchman by Harper Lee

Go Set a WatchmanGo Set a Watchman” introduces a more mature, wordly Scout whose worldview is shattered when she discovers that her father is a racist. I was wary going into this book as I love the Atticus Finch of To Kill a Mockingbird. Right form the beginning of Watchman, though, I was immediately drawn into Lee’s beautiful prose. Less has perfectly characterized the deep south at the beginning of the Civil Rights Movement. Watchman is a much more uncomfortable read compared to Mockingbird, mainly because racism is not only found in the faces of the villains. Though it is easy to discount Watchman as a first draft Mockingbird, it stands alone as a separate but equally important story.”  ~Patron review, July 2015

” ‘I need a watchman to go forth and proclaim to them all that 26 years is too long to play a joke on anybody.’ The Scout we know from Mockingbird returns as Jean Louise with the same free spirit, tenacity, and passion. She returns to Maycomb and finds that her father in not the hero she remembers and even Calpurnia sees the Finch’s differently. Jean Louise is one of the few who sees black people and white people as equally worthy of civil rights, and Lee tells this poetic but heartbreaking story that is just as important as Mockingbird.”  ~Summer Staff review by Graeme M., July 2015

Category: Historical Fiction

The Garneau Block by Todd Babiak

garneaublock_cover

“Todd is a local writer and Edmontonian. This story took place in the Garneau area with a few select characters. I enjoyed his sense of writing but I did not feel the story line to captivating.  I did enjoy relating to location, building, etc.”  ~Patron review, July 2015

Category: Sense of Place

 

 

 

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